english dictionary definition meaningYesDictionary.com



a   b   c   d   e   f   g   h   i   j   k   l   m   n   o   p   q   r   s   t   u   v   w   x   y   z   







Lookup English Definition:

observation    : [,ɑbzɚv'eʃən]
Observation \Ob`ser*va"tion\, n. [L. observatio: cf. F.
observation.]
1. The act or the faculty of observing or taking notice; the
act of seeing, or of fixing the mind upon, anything.
[1913 Webster]

My observation, which very seldom lies. --Shak.
[1913 Webster]

2. The result of an act, or of acts, of observing; view;
reflection; conclusion; judgment.
[1913 Webster]

In matters of human prudence, we shall find the
greatest advantage in making wise observations on
our conduct. --I. Watts.
[1913 Webster]

3. Hence: An expression of an opinion or judgment upon what
one has observed; a remark. "That's a foolish
observation." --Shak.
[1913 Webster]

To observations which ourselves we make
We grow more partial for the observer's sake.
--Pope.
[1913 Webster]

4. Performance of what is prescribed; adherence in practice;
observance. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

We are to procure dispensation or leave to omit the
observation of it in such circumstances. --Jer.
Taylor.
[1913 Webster]

5. (Science)
(a) The act of recognizing and noting some fact or
occurrence in nature, as an aurora, a corona, or the
structure of an animal.
(b) Specifically, the act of measuring, with suitable
instruments, some magnitude, as the time of an
occultation, with a clock; the right ascension of a
star, with a transit instrument and clock; the sun's
altitude, or the distance of the moon from a star,
with a sextant; the temperature, with a thermometer,
etc.
(c) The information so acquired; as, to record one's
observations carefully.
[1913 Webster]

Note: When a phenomenon is scrutinized as it occurs in
nature, the act is termed an observation. When the
conditions under which the phenomenon occurs are
artificial, or arranged beforehand by the observer, the
process is called an experiment. Experiment includes
observation.
[1913 Webster]

{To take an observation} (Naut.), to ascertain the altitude
of a heavenly body, with a view to fixing a vessel's
position at sea.
[1913 Webster]

Syn: Observance; notice; attention; remark; comment; note.
See {Observance}.
[1913 Webster]

observation
n 1: the act of making and recording a measurement
2: the act of observing; taking a patient look [synonym:
{observation}, {observance}, {watching}]
3: a remark expressing careful consideration [synonym:
{observation}, {reflection}, {reflexion}]
4: facts learned by observing; "he reported his observations to
the mayor"
5: the act of noticing or paying attention; "he escaped the
notice of the police" [synonym: {notice}, {observation},
{observance}]

165 Moby Thesaurus words for "observation":
Parthian shot, accordance, acquittal, acquittance, address,
adherence, advertence, advertency, affirmation, alertness,
allegation, announcement, answer, apostrophe, apprehension,
assertion, assiduity, assiduousness, assumption, attention,
attention span, attentiveness, attitude, averment, awareness,
bugging, care, carrying out, climate of opinion,
cloak-and-dagger work, cognizance, comment, commentary,
common belief, community sentiment, compliance, conceit,
concentration, concept, conception, conclusion, conformance,
conformity, consciousness, consensus gentium, consideration,
counterespionage, counterintelligence, crack, criticism,
declaration, dictum, diligence, discharge, discovery, ear,
earnestness, electronic surveillance, espial, espionage, estimate,
estimation, ethos, examination, exclamation, execution, expression,
eye, fancy, feeling, following, fulfillment, general belief,
greeting, heed, heedfulness, heeding, idea, image, imago,
impression, inspection, intellectual object, intelligence,
intelligence work, intentiveness, intentness, interjection,
judgment, keeping, lights, looking, lookout, mark, memory-trace,
mental image, mental impression, mention, military intelligence,
mind, mindfulness, mystique, note, notice, notion, obiter dictum,
observance, opinion, perception, performance, personal judgment,
phrase, point of view, popular belief, position, posture, practice,
presumption, prevailing belief, proclamation, pronouncement,
public belief, public opinion, question, reaction, recept,
reflection, regard, regardfulness, remark, representation, respect,
satisfaction, say, saying, scrutiny, secret police, secret service,
sentence, sentiment, shadowing, sight, spying, stakeout, stance,
statement, subjoinder, supposition, surveillance, survey, tailing,
theory, thinking, thought, trailing, utterance, view, viewing,
watch, watching, way of thinking, wiretap, wiretapping, witnessing,
word



install english dictionary definition & meaning lookup widget!


english dictionary definition meaning工具:
Select Color:

































































english dictionary meaning information:
  • English to French, Italian, German Spanish Dictionary . . .
    Spanish Dictionaries There are two free Spanish-English dictionaries: our own dictionary and one from Collins Each has its own strengths Combined, they are unbeatable
  • Regard - definition of regard by The Free Dictionary
    Usage Note: Regard is traditionally used in the singular in the phrase in regard (not in regards) to In our 2004 survey, barely six percent of the Usage Panel accepted the phrase in regards to Slightly more than half the Panel found the syntactically peculiar as regards acceptable in the sentence These surveys show a high level of satisfaction with government policy among the elderly in the
  • lookout - Dizionario inglese-italiano WordReference
    lookout - Traduzione del vocabolo e dei suoi composti, e discussioni del forum
  • Philosophy - definition of philosophy by The Free Dictionary
    Quotations "Philosophy may teach us to bear with equanimity the misfortunes of our neighbours" [Oscar Wilde The English Renaissance of Art] "Philosophy is a good horse in the stable, but an arrant jade on a journey" [Oliver Goldsmith The Good-Natur'd Man] "All good moral philosophy is but an handmaid to religion" [Francis Bacon The Advancement of Learning]
  • Cardinal | Definition of Cardinal by Merriam-Webster
    Did You Know? Our word cardinal goes back to the Latin adjective cardinalis, which meant “serving as a hinge ”The root of this word is the noun cardo, meaning “hinge ”Since a hinge is the device on which a door turns, cardo came to mean “something on which a development turns” or “something very important ” Later the Roman Catholic Church used the adjective cardinalis to refer
  • Sedge | Definition of Sedge by Merriam-Webster
    History and Etymology for sedge Middle English segge, from Old English secg; akin to Middle High German segge sedge, Old English sagu saw — more at saw
  • Looming | Define Looming at Dictionary. com
    Explore Dictionary com Is It Time For All Couples To Use The Term Partner? Can You Translate These Famous Phrases From Emoji? These Are the Longest Words in English
  • Look up | Define Look up at Dictionary. com
    v Old English locian "use the eyes for seeing, gaze, look, behold, spy," from West Germanic *lokjan (cf Old Saxon lokon "see, look, spy," Middle Dutch loeken "to look," Old High German luogen, German dialectal lugen "to look out"), of unknown origin, perhaps cognate with Breton lagud "eye " In Old English, usually with on; the use of at began 14c Meaning "seek, search out" is c 1300
  • Inductive Bible Study: Interpretation | Precept Austin
    Here is an excellent summary of literalism from the recommended website Gotquestions org: "What is biblical literalism?" Answer: Biblical literalism is the method of interpreting Scripture that holds that, except in places where the text is obviously allegorical, poetic, or figurative, it should be taken literally Biblical literalism is the position of most evangelicals and Christian
  • Time complexity - Wikipedia
    In computer science, the time complexity is the computational complexity that describes the amount of time it takes to run an algorithm Time complexity is commonly estimated by counting the number of elementary operations performed by the algorithm, supposing that each elementary operation takes a fixed amount of time to perform





English Dictionary  2005-2009

|dictionary |Business Directories,Company Directories |ZIP Code,Postal Code