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fear    : [f'ɪr]
Fear \Fear\ (f[=e]r), n.
A variant of {Fere}, a mate, a companion. [Obs.] --Spenser.
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Fear \Fear\, n. [OE. fer, feer, fere, AS. f[=ae]r a coming
suddenly upon, fear, danger; akin to D. vaar, OHG. f[=a]ra
danger, G. gefahr, Icel. f[=a]r harm, mischief, plague, and
to E. fare, peril. See {Fare}.]
1. A painful emotion or passion excited by the expectation of
evil, or the apprehension of impending danger;
apprehension; anxiety; solicitude; alarm; dread.
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Note: The degrees of this passion, beginning with the most
moderate, may be thus expressed, -- {apprehension},
fear, {dread}, {fright}, {terror}.
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Fear is an uneasiness of the mind, upon the
thought of future evil likely to befall us.
--Locke.
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Where no hope is left, is left no fear. --Milton.
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2. (Script.)
(a) Apprehension of incurring, or solicitude to avoid,
God's wrath; the trembling and awful reverence felt
toward the Supreme Being.
(b) Respectful reverence for men of authority or worth.
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I will put my fear in their hearts. --Jer.
xxxii. 40.
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I will teach you the fear of the Lord. --Ps.
xxxiv. 11.
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Render therefore to all their dues; tribute to
whom tribute is due . . . fear to whom fear.
--Rom. xiii.
7.
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3. That which causes, or which is the object of, apprehension
or alarm; source or occasion of terror; danger;
dreadfulness.
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There were they in great fear, where no fear was.
--Ps. liii. 5.
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The fear of your adventure would counsel you to a
more equal enterprise. --Shak.
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{For fear}, in apprehension lest. "For fear you ne'er see
chain nor money more." --Shak.
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Fear \Fear\, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Feared} (f[=e]rd); p. pr. &
vb. n. {Fearing}.] [OE. feren, faeren, to frighten, to be
afraid, AS. f[=ae]ran to terrify. See {Fear}, n.]
1. To feel a painful apprehension of; to be afraid of; to
consider or expect with emotion of alarm or solicitude.
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I will fear no evil, for thou art with me. --Ps.
xxiii. 4.
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Note: With subordinate clause.

I greatly fear my money is not safe. --Shak.

I almost fear to quit your hand. --D. Jerrold.
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2. To have a reverential awe of; to be solicitous to avoid
the displeasure of.
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Leave them to God above; him serve and fear.
--Milton.
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3. To be anxious or solicitous for; now replaced by {fear
for}. [R.]
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The sins of the father are to be laid upon the
children, therefore . . . I fear you. --Shak.
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4. To suspect; to doubt. [Obs.]
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Ay what else, fear you not her courage? --Shak.
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5. To affright; to terrify; to drive away or prevent approach
of by fear. [Obs.]
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Fear their people from doing evil. --Robynson
(More's
Utopia).
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Tush, tush! fear boys with bugs. --Shak.

Syn: To apprehend; dread; reverence; venerate.
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Fear \Fear\, v. i.
To be in apprehension of evil; to be afraid; to feel anxiety
on account of some expected evil.
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I exceedingly fear and quake. --Heb. xii.
21.
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Fere \Fere\, n. [OE. fere companion, AS. gef[=e]ra, from
f[=e]ran to go, travel, faran to travel. [root]78. See
{Fare}.]
A mate or companion; -- often used of a wife. [Obs.] [Written
also {fear} and {feere}.] --Chaucer.
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And Cambel took Cambrina to his fere. --Spenser.
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{In fere}, together; in company. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
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fear
n 1: an emotion experienced in anticipation of some specific
pain or danger (usually accompanied by a desire to flee or
fight) [synonym: {fear}, {fearfulness}, {fright}] [ant:
{bravery}, {fearlessness}]
2: an anxious feeling; "care had aged him"; "they hushed it up
out of fear of public reaction" [synonym: {concern}, {care},
{fear}]
3: a feeling of profound respect for someone or something; "the
fear of God"; "the Chinese reverence for the dead"; "the
French treat food with gentle reverence"; "his respect for
the law bordered on veneration" [synonym: {fear}, {reverence},
{awe}, {veneration}]
v 1: be afraid or feel anxious or apprehensive about a possible
or probable situation or event; "I fear she might get
aggressive"
2: be afraid or scared of; be frightened of; "I fear the winters
in Moscow"; "We should not fear the Communists!" [synonym:
{fear}, {dread}]
3: be sorry; used to introduce an unpleasant statement; "I fear
I won't make it to your wedding party"
4: be uneasy or apprehensive about; "I fear the results of the
final exams"
5: regard with feelings of respect and reverence; consider
hallowed or exalted or be in awe of; "Fear God as your
father"; "We venerate genius" [synonym: {reverence}, {fear},
{revere}, {venerate}]

171 Moby Thesaurus words for "fear":
abulia, agitation, alarm, all-overs, angst, anticipate, anxiety,
anxiety hysteria, anxiety neurosis, anxious bench, anxious concern,
anxious seat, anxiousness, apprehend, apprehension,
apprehensiveness, attack of nerves, awe, back down, balance,
be afraid, bete noire, bogey, bogy, buck fever, bugbear,
cankerworm of care, care, case of nerves, chicken-liveredness,
chickenheartedness, cold feet, cold sweat, concern, concernment,
consternation, cowardice, cowardliness, cravenness, debate,
deliberate, demur, diffidence, discomposure, dismay, disquiet,
disquietude, distress, disturbance, dread, esteem,
excessive irritability, expect, eye askance, faintheart,
faintheartedness, faintness, falter, fearfulness, feeblemindedness,
feebleness, fidgetiness, fidgets, foreboding, forebodingness,
forebodings, foresee, frailty, fright, funk, hang back,
have qualms, hem and haw, henheartedness, hesitate, hesitation,
horror, hover, hum and haw, imagine, infirmity, inquietude, jib,
lily-liveredness, malaise, milksopism, milksoppiness,
milksoppishness, misgive, misgiving, morbid excitability, nerves,
nervosity, nervous stomach, nervous strain, nervous tension,
nervousness, nightmare, overanxiety, panic, panickiness, pause,
perturbation, phobia, pigeonheartedness, pins and needles,
pliability, ponder, presentiment, pucker, pull back, qualms,
quiver, respect, retreat, revere, reverence, scare, scruple,
second thoughts, shilly-shally, shrink from, shudder at, shy,
sit upon thorns, softness, solicitude, spell of nerves,
spinelessness, stage fright, stand aghast, state of nerves, stew,
stick at, stickle, stop to consider, straddle the fence, strain,
strain at, suspect, suspense, tension, terror, think twice about,
tic, timidity, timidness, timorousness, trepidation, trepidity,
trouble, twitching, unease, uneasiness, unmanfulness, unmanliness,
unquietness, upset, vellication, venerate, veneration, vexation,
weak will, weak-mindedness, weakheartedness, weakness, withdraw,
worry, yellowness, yield, zeal



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English Dictionary  2005-2009

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